Console wars are won with content

The_Binding_of_IsaacIn the wake of E3 2015 many are weighing in about what games are the best graphically and which are the most anticipated. Some point to the impressive graphics of a handful of the titles announced for the PS4 while others look to the exclusives and fan favorite releases on the XBOX One.  In an interview with GamingBolt prior to E3, Hussain Sheikh said some things that I think are going to be key to the future success both for game companies as well as consoles. He concluded his thoughts about both the XBOX One and the PS4 having sufficient computing power by saying that the console battle will, “not be won through graphics, but actual gameplay and content.” I have written about this topic before, but it seems more relevant after so many games have been announced that may or may not deliver the goods. Continue reading

Advertisements

Exclusive Titles Aren’t Helping Anyone

Rise of the tomb raiderSince the beginning of the console battle exclusive titles have been central to the differences between them. For the longest time it was Mario vs Sonic, with both characters squarely representing the different choices of available consoles. As time went on, exclusives became less tied to a central character and more tied to a marketing strategy. The most memorable and potentially the most advantageous exclusive probably should be awarded to Halo. It certainly catapulted the Xbox to the forefront of the console war, but has since failed to be enough. Now it seems processing power and graphics have become a bigger marketing tool, which inevitably leads to exclusives that are graphically dependent. The Last of Us is one of the best video games I have ever played, but I only got to play it because my brother lent me a PS3. And it doesn’t always help as the brilliant graphics of The Order 1886 didn’t save it from scathing reviews about a lack of content and short game length. The primary reason some games are exclusive is due to the limitations of the other available consoles, and the same is certainly true for future titles like No Man’s Sky and the next installment of Uncharted. But are gamers benefiting from this practice? Or does everyone lose? Continue reading